I see things differently

At midnight we crossed into July, commencing the “pride month” that matters to me. Tomorrow, the 2nd, marks the 246th anniversary of American independence. This coming Monday we’ll celebrate the signing of the Declaration of Independence.

It’s my favorite time of year and the most meaningful, trumping all other observances. Our independence as a nation girds our Liberty as individuals, which is the highest aspiration of man — “to secure these rights.”

I honor all who sacrificed to ensure my Liberty, especially the 56 men who committed high treason against the Crown by affixing their names to the Declaration. The signers publicly expressed contempt for an illegitimate government, knowing that they risked a death sentence by doing so.

Most Americans don’t acknowledge that anymore, much less embrace what it means to pledge their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor.

I do.

I guess I see things differently. In a culture that fêtes racial and sexual identity with entire months and federal holidays, formally celebrates heritage other than “American” and derides patriotism, I’m the guy who pauses on April 19th and plants 56 flags in my yard on the Fourth of July.

I know what happened in Athens, Tennessee in 1946. I remember Ruby Ridge. I’m infuriated by the illegal and unconstitutional persecution of Liberty-loving Americans in the aftermath of January 6th, 2021.

I’m a born-free American — a citizen, not a subject. It’s the difference between love-of-country and obedience to a totalitarian State that’s abandoned its purpose — “to secure these rights.”

Tomorrow evening Deb and I will be at The Bluestone when Aaron Lewis take the stage. No doubt he’ll perform a song that asks a pointed question of his fellow Americans. I’ll close today with that question:

“Am I the only one?”


One year ago today, we christened our toad “Mercy.” At the time I wrote,

“Mercy Otis Warren was an incendiary poet, playwright and pamphleteer who fearlessly challenged the authority of the Crown and tirelessly campaigned for individual liberties. She was, in essence and effect, the equivalent of Thomas Paine, and she’s rightly been called ‘The Conscience of the Revolution.'”


Take care of yourselves, Patriots. Stay calm. Stay sharp. Stay free.

#WiseUp #LibertyOrDeath

#LetsGoBrandon